Namibia, the second-least densely populated country in the world is home to some of the largest sanddunes. This is where the adventure begins. more >
A short distance from the dunes, we drive east through some of the oldest canyons on earth, the gateway to one of last safe havens for the elusive black rhino. more >
Leaving the Canyon region, we head west to the Waterberg plateau, the home of the Cheetah Conservation Fund research center and one of the largest protected habitats for the fastest predator on earth. more >
Known as the river that never finds the sea, the Okavango spills billions of liters of water daily in the Kalahari desert, creating one of the most pristine and untouched wildlife refuge in the world. more >
Although the Chobe river is less than 300 km from the Okavango, there are no road crossing the Delta, so we have to drive all around the southern part of the flooding plains. more >
A few kilometers downstream the Chobe river merges with the mighty Zambezi and leads us to one of the seven wonders of nature, Victoria Falls on the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe. more >
The short-rain season came early in the East African plains and we were anxious to head to the Serengeti for a chance to see the herds of the great migration. more >
It is hard to believe that Lake Manyara with its small tropical forest is less than an hour drive from the dry Tarangire. more >
As soon as we clear the top of the escarpment at Lake Manyara, we reach the slope of the Ngorongoro crater, the largest volcanic cauldron on earth and one of the most unique African ecosystems. more >
As soon as we clear the top of the escarpment at Lake Manyara, we reach the slope of the Ngorongoro crater, the largest volcanic cauldron on earth and one of the most unique African ecosystems. more >
Mount Kilimanjaro is located in Tanzania right on the border with Kenya. Peaking at 5,895 m., it is the tallest mountain in Africa. more >